Author Topic: University Experiences  (Read 3297 times)

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younghopeful

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Re: University Experiences
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2012, 07:31:03 PM »
One thought about nursing in Spain: Check on your ability to get hired. You won't be able to "opositar" for a public hospital or public health service nursing position unless you're an EU citizen or married to one.
I am aware of that, which is why I was going to put nursing on the back burner for a while. As I stated in my previous post, I would like to do a Masters in Spain in the USEV and I was wondering if you had any information on it. I hope one day to gain citizenship to the EU by marrying an EU citizen. Not just for the papers, but for the right intentions. Then, begin the arduous process of applying for permanent residence and EU passport. All in due time, I'm still too young to be seriously thinking about it.  ;D

Also, I would like to know your experience in Spain so far or in the past studying in a university environment and how long it took you to get there. The process and everything if you can tell me.

halydia

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Re: University Experiences
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2012, 12:31:26 AM »
I am aware of that, which is why I was going to put nursing on the back burner for a while. As I stated in my previous post, I would like to do a Masters in Spain in the USEV and I was wondering if you had any information on it. I hope one day to gain citizenship to the EU by marrying an EU citizen. Not just for the papers, but for the right intentions. Then, begin the arduous process of applying for permanent residence and EU passport. All in due time, I'm still too young to be seriously thinking about it.  ;D

Also, I would like to know your experience in Spain so far or in the past studying in a university environment and how long it took you to get there. The process and everything if you can tell me.

The only issues I've run into with applying for a Master's degree have been when looking at applying to a public university. I had absolutely no issues getting into both private universities that I applied to. I didn't need to have my degree legalized in any way to get in. I'm actually studying online, and must admit I would have preferred a traditional university experience but with work I don't have the time.

I'm sorry I wasn't more complete with my last answer. I checked the board this morning before work, saw the desire to be a "matrón" and said oh dear...

As for your questions:
What did you end up studying in Spain? Secondary Education with a Concentration in Spanish Language. Why? I can use it to take the official teaching test if I decide to work in the private system and will have another Spanish credential should I return to the US. (Even though my degree might not count there).
Have you finished? How has it been going if you are still studying? I'm due to finish this spring. As I mentioned earlier, its through an online university and I'm not sure if it's the fact that it's online or if it's the fact that it's Spain, but I'm having a more difficult time and getting worse marks than I ever did in university.
What are you doing now? Studying, teaching, and doing freelance writing. I wish I had more time to sleep!

younghopeful

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Re: University Experiences
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2012, 07:29:41 AM »
I too look at the word matrón and say oh dear now. It seems as if my dream of being one is very far away from becoming reality.  I just won't be able to get my degree homologado in time :-[
So, I decided to just continue with my Spanish language acquisition and do a Masters in Spanish. Though I still have to figure out which one. I am constantly translating everything from English to Spanish, from what I see on the street, to live conversations that I am having with someone (even as I type this I feel myself translating). So, I may do the Masters in Translation and Interculturality (not sure how to translate Interculturalidad to English), but that's what I am thinking.

Why was it challenging to apply to a public university? You would think that applying to a private uni would be difficult.
So are you studying online with the university from within Spain and teaching at the same time?

I am shooting to be able to go to the USEV and be present rather than going online. I would learn better and sitting behind a computer wouldn't be stimulating for me.
If you don't mind me asking, how much did/does it cost you to study a Masters in Spain? Do you pay more or generally the same amount as an EU citizen?

I am so relieved to hear that you didn't have to get your degree legalized in any way to get it, I am hoping that I have the same luck.
Are you in Spain on a student visa? Since your uni is online, did they still grant you a student visa for it?
How long did it take you to apply and get in? I am seriously hoping to be back in Spain for the 2013-2014 curso with a vacation to Sevilla in April-June for Feria. Then come back and get visa papers sorted out and preparing things to leave...for the third time. My ultimate goal is to become a permanent resident of Spain. So, we'll see how it goes. :crosses fingers:

Is the language something that you find difficult? And therefore you are getting bad grades?

I also fear the same. I will be on their turf studying under their language and bureaucratic system and I fear that no one will want to help me. But, I lived there for 2 important years of my life so I'll make it work!

halydia

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Re: University Experiences
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2012, 10:34:41 AM »
I too look at the word matrón and say oh dear now. It seems as if my dream of being one is very far away from becoming reality.  I just won't be able to get my degree homologado in time :-[
So, I decided to just continue with my Spanish language acquisition and do a Masters in Spanish. Though I still have to figure out which one. I am constantly translating everything from English to Spanish, from what I see on the street, to live conversations that I am having with someone (even as I type this I feel myself translating). So, I may do the Masters in Translation and Interculturality (not sure how to translate Interculturalidad to English), but that's what I am thinking.

Why was it challenging to apply to a public university? You would think that applying to a private uni would be difficult.
So are you studying online with the university from within Spain and teaching at the same time?

I am shooting to be able to go to the USEV and be present rather than going online. I would learn better and sitting behind a computer wouldn't be stimulating for me.
If you don't mind me asking, how much did/does it cost you to study a Masters in Spain? Do you pay more or generally the same amount as an EU citizen?

I am so relieved to hear that you didn't have to get your degree legalized in any way to get it, I am hoping that I have the same luck.
Are you in Spain on a student visa? Since your uni is online, did they still grant you a student visa for it?
How long did it take you to apply and get in? I am seriously hoping to be back in Spain for the 2013-2014 curso with a vacation to Sevilla in April-June for Feria. Then come back and get visa papers sorted out and preparing things to leave...for the third time. My ultimate goal is to become a permanent resident of Spain. So, we'll see how it goes. :crosses fingers:

Is the language something that you find difficult? And therefore you are getting bad grades?

I also fear the same. I will be on their turf studying under their language and bureaucratic system and I fear that no one will want to help me. But, I lived there for 2 important years of my life so I'll make it work!

For the degree I'm studying, I would've needed a Spanish degree (homologado to a specific major) to be considered easily for the public university. Because I'm just homologado a grado I was at the back of the line for consideration to be admitted.

I am studying and teaching. My situation is different, however, since I'm a Spanish resident and can legally live and work here. I'm nearly 100% certain that visas are not granted for online universities. I payed somewhere under 4000 euros for a one year program. From application to being admitted, the whole process for both universities took just around a month.

I'm not getting bad grades, I'm actually doing better than some of my Spanish peers. However, the language is occasionally a struggle and I have a "C2"/superior/bilingual level of Spanish. It just means I have to study longer and work harder to learn the information when it comes time for the tests. In terms of homework and other assignments, I'm getting good grades. It's just a lot harder for me to study than it used to be.

younghopeful

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Re: University Experiences
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2012, 08:25:27 AM »
For the degree I'm studying, I would've needed a Spanish degree (homologado to a specific major) to be considered easily for the public university. Because I'm just homologado a grado I was at the back of the line for consideration to be admitted.

I am studying and teaching. My situation is different, however, since I'm a Spanish resident and can legally live and work here. I'm nearly 100% certain that visas are not granted for online universities. I payed somewhere under 4000 euros for a one year program. From application to being admitted, the whole process for both universities took just around a month.

I'm not getting bad grades, I'm actually doing better than some of my Spanish peers. However, the language is occasionally a struggle and I have a "C2"/superior/bilingual level of Spanish. It just means I have to study longer and work harder to learn the information when it comes time for the tests. In terms of homework and other assignments, I'm getting good grades. It's just a lot harder for me to study than it used to be.

Ahh I see. I am trying with all of my might to not need to get anything homologado. The coordinator for the Masters in Traducción emailed me back and said how he doesn't see how I would need to get anything homologado in order to apply. However, he says this thinking about a Masters. So, I may shoot him an email asking him if the same applies for me in terms of applying for another Bachelors.

How lucky you are to already be a Spanish resident!!! Have you lived there long enough to get permanent residency? I want to be able to live there for at least 5 years to be able to apply for a residency card in the future.
So, even with a C2 level of Spanish you still find it challenging? Wow. I may have to take the DELE exam in order to prove that I am proficient in Spanish enough to do a Bachelors in Spanish. One of the Masters actually requires that I am proficient in at least 2 languages between levels B1 and C1. So, I see a lot of French cramming in my future xD

Do you think that your process took a month because you already had your degree homologado a grado and the fact that it's a step above those of us who don't have any homologado at all?

Also, how did you get to be a C2 level in Spanish? Was it just by living there and learning on your own or did you take any classes? I feel confident in saying that I am at least a C1 level in Spanish, but a C2 for me would be amazing. Since the DELE exam is only administered 3 times a year I have to wait until May since I just missed it this month by 2 days (if it truly is necessary for me to take).

 

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