Author Topic: Any U.S. citizens who have obtained their Spanish citizenship?  (Read 34351 times)

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BEB

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Re: Any U.S. citizens who have obtained their Spanish citizenship?
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2016, 06:43:03 AM »
For those curious, my family and I ran into this question for ourselves, and we found this US State Department page that describes what happens in terms of being required to give up your US citizenship.

Long and short of it is that while Spain might make you say "yes, I'll give up my US citizenship", they don't check to see if you do it; and the US won't take it away from you for simply being naturalized and for saying that you will give it up.

The page is at https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/citizenship-and-dual-nationality.html

The first section lays out the law (the "INA", Immigration and Naturalization Act) that controls these kinds of questions.

The section "Potentially Expatriating Acts" talks about the things that can be used by the government to take away someone's US citizenship.  BUT... as the INA says, someone has to do these things both voluntarily AND with the intention to relinquish citizenship.

Then they list the various things.  The only ones that really apply are #1 and #2, getting naturalized in another country and taking an oath of allegiance to another country.

The section "Administrative Standard of Evidence" is the one that is the big deal.  The US knows people get naturalized in other nations all the time, but that most of them do NOT intend on giving up their US citizenship, so it has to decide how to treat those actions.

What this section says is that the State Department acts on the premise that when someone does that, they intend on keeping their US citizenship.

So then the section "Disposition of Cases when Administrative Premise is Applicable" talks about what the US will actually DO if and when they find out someone got naturalized in another nation. 

It says two things- first, there's no requirement for the person to tell the government ahead of time that they're going to do it, because the US government will assume that they mean to retain US citizenship; and second, that if a US consular officer finds out that someone got naturalized in another nation, they'll simply ask that person "did you mean to give up US citizenship?"  If the person replies "no", meaning they want to remain a US citizen, then "the consular officer will certify that it was not the person's intent to relinquish U.S. nationality and, consequently, find that the person has retained U.S. nationality."

truth89

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Re: Any U.S. citizens who have obtained their Spanish citizenship?
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2016, 02:50:15 PM »
Hi Everyone,

So I know this post is old and I saw a great response by one of the people who responded about how the US handles Dual Citizenship cases, but I thought that it may be useful to see what the US Consulate in Barcelona says about the topic with reference to Spain specifically at the following website.

http://barcelona.usconsulate.gov/citizen-services/births/dual.html

Basically, the US recognizes that there are many ways that one can have dual citizenship given the multitude of laws there are about it internationally. They understand renouncing US citizenship to be an entirely different process that would be done in front of a US consular officer, requiring two appointments (so you can think it over). Short answer, it is allowed and you will not automatically lose your US citizenship by gaining your Spanish citizenship.

Second, I contacted a Spanish lawyer with the question and they replied with the following answer (in Spanish):

  Por Áºltimo, algo que consideramos que debes tener en consideración es que el artÁ­culo 23 del Código Civil establece como requisito para adquirir la nacionalidad española que renuncies a la tuya. AsÁ­ pues, establece:
 
“ArtÁ­culo 23
Son requisitos comunes para la validez de la adquisición de la nacionalidad española por opción, carta de naturaleza o residencia:
a) Que el mayor de catorce años y capaz para prestar una declaración por sÁ­ jure o prometa fidelidad al Rey y obediencia a la Constitución y a las leyes.
b) Que la misma persona declare que renuncia a su anterior nacionalidad. Quedan a salvo de este requisito los naturales de paÁ­ses mencionados en el apartado 1 del artÁ­culo 24 y los sefardÁ­es originarios de España.
c) Que la adquisición se inscriba en el Registro Civil español.
 
Hemos estudiado lo que implica esta renuncia y a priori, segÁºn entiende la Dirección General de Registros y Notariado (DGRN)se trata de una mera declaración sin efectos en tu paÁ­s de origen. Si bien, hemos realizado esta consulta en la embajada de EEUU y nos piden que sea el interesado el que la formule.  No obstante, sÁ­ te puedo pasar una consulta de la DGRN en este sentido pero lo interesante serÁ­a que lo corrobores en tu paÁ­s:
 
EDD 2014/286246 Res. DGRN de 11 abril 2014. Registro Civil: “(…)la renuncia a la nacionalidad anterior que exige el artÁ­culo 23 b) del Código civil como requisito de validez de la adquisición de la nacionalidad española ha sido interpretada por la doctrina oficial de la Dirección General de los Registros y del Notariado como un mero requisito formal de "declaración de la renuncia ", con independencia de los efectos que tal declaración pueda desplegar para el ordenamiento jurÁ­dico extranjero respectivo, es decir, al margen de que dicha renuncia produzca o no de iure la pérdida de la nacionalidad a la que se declara renunciar , ya que lo contrario implicarÁ­a subordinar la adquisición de la nacionalidad española a la concepción propia sobre la nacionalidad del Derecho extranjero (vid. Resolución de 24 de septiembre de 1971)”.

So it seems that in multiple ways, your US citizenship will not be affected and you can get Spanish citizenship if you so please (although do remember that I am not a lawyer and all cases should be triple checked with the consulate and a Spanish lawyer before proceeding in case of doubt).

Hope that helps!

pfox

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Re: Any U.S. citizens who have obtained their Spanish citizenship?
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2016, 03:26:09 AM »
I did it.   The spanish embassy doesnt physically ask you to give up your citizenship per se.   In fact, US and Spain do NOT have reciprocal relationships, and thus this would be very difficult to prove either way.  The spansh embassy lady said it was just a verbal formality in that you then COULD NOT USE YOUR US PASSPORT in SPain if something came up since signed that you had 'given up your US rights if on Spanish soil"

Also, you cannot renounce your US citizenship unless you are physically on US ground.  That is, a US embassy or US soil, so even if you said you did, it wouldnt be recognized by US authorities

cafeconleche

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Re: Any U.S. citizens who have obtained their Spanish citizenship?
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2017, 02:08:55 PM »
I'd like to point a couple of things out, as there is disparate information here.

Firstly, US citizens swearing allegiance to the Spanish king and renouncing other allegiances at a swearing in ceremony does nothing to your US citizenship. But, please also know that those naturalizing in the US also swear to renounce other allegiances, with essentially no effect unless the other countries of which the person is a citizen care about it. The US does not, and Spain also does not.

In most cases, countries that allow/recognize dual citizenship consider their citizens theirs alone, i.e. the US considers US citizens as just that - only US citizens - even if they are also Spanish, Australian and/or Pakistani citizens. Spain might have special recognition of some of its nationals, like those who are also nationals of Portugal or Colombia, but the fact that Spain considers US citizens who naturalize in Spain as only Spanish is nothing new, and nothing to be afraid of.