Author Topic: convalidating a u.s. degree  (Read 24352 times)

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mll22

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2009, 10:31:31 PM »
 But I did apply for the degree or title of Magistero  which at the time was the equivalent of three years, but recently the requirement has changed to 4 years.  I had a BA in Liberal Arts, a teacher credential in elementary education, and various TEFL and education courses that I used to apply for the Magisterio degree.  It worked and that's all I really care about at this point.  I lucked out really.

Hi chuvin:
was just curious where you got your teaching degrees from?  thanks!

Nina.Jedina

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2009, 07:09:16 PM »
Hey guys, if you haven´t turned in any of your information yet, it´s pointless to go to the Paseo de Prado 28 (I was simply redirected to calle AlcalÁ¡ 36, where you pick a number and talk to someone who can be of more assistance). When you get all your papers together, you turn them in to Los Madrazo number 17 (all of these buildings probably close before 2, not that I checked, but I think the PdP office is open Saturday mornings as well). From what I understood, you used to go to that address, but they cut down bureaucracy by having people turn in their documentation to the LM address, and from there on, they take it over to the PdP address.

Anyone else on the board getting their degrees homologado? At this point, they will still ask you if you did 3 years (diplomatura) or 5 years (licenciatura). Now granted, those of us from the States have spent different periods of times at the university (example, I did undergrad in 3.5 years, and finished my masters in a couple of years). If you have a master´s, go for the licenciatura, and if they want to bring it down to diplomatura, ask if you can take some courses on the side in order to bring it up to licenciatura-always aim high, it can´t hurt!

Expat_teacher

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2009, 07:45:07 PM »
Do they really consider an undergraduate degree to be along the same lines as a Diplomatura? Everyone I know who has a bachelor's degree equates it to a licienciatura!

Nina.Jedina

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2009, 10:15:42 AM »
I think the problem comes in with their view that the undergrad is 3 years and a master another 2, therefore if you have an underground degree that lasted 4 years, it wouldn´t be considered enough for a Spanish equivalent of master. Bear in mind that this all becomes just so much more confusing when you try to translate U.S. system to Spanish old system to Bologna new system.

To give an idea, in order to be considered for applying for a PhD I had to somehow prove that I had finished 3000 hours of contact hours between undergraduate and graduate degrees. Figuring out to translate credits into hours was an exhausting process-to me the idea of how the number of hours I´d spent in the classroom seemed bizarre after a lifetime of dealing with so-called credit hours at my large, public state university. The Spanish university did, however, convalidate them without a problem once I had turned in everything they requested from me.

It´s worrisome in my opinion to think that people who studied at a fast pace and finished their undergrad degrees in 2.5 years and their master´s in another might be in essence punished for being being hard-working students since their studies did not last as long as the average student´s did, even though they obtained the same degrees in the end.

halydia

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2010, 05:53:35 PM »
Aupa a todos!

I've began the arduous task of convalidating of my degree here in Spain. I was just wondering how long it took for the degree to be legalized once handed in to the Spanish authorities. I'm really hoping to be able to take my Masters in ESO next year, but they want my degree legal when pre-inscripcion comes around in May.

This has been a helpful topic to read, and I was happy to see the generally positive tone of the posts! It seems like such a scary process when looking at it on paper...

unohooim7

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2010, 12:12:19 AM »
Does anyone have any updates to this post? I may convalidatating my bachelors just in case I want to study while abroad.

halydia

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2010, 12:43:19 AM »
Does anyone have any updates to this post? I may convalidatating my bachelors just in case I want to study while abroad.

I've finally got the seals from the Canadian and Spanish governments saying that the pieces of paper that say I went to university aren't fake. This took three months so far. I imagine that if your degree is from a country that uses the Apostille of the Hague this first bit goes quicker.

The full on homologacion bit sounds like it's going to take a lot longer. I'm going to speak with the folks in the Ministry of Education two weeks from now, and can hopefully update more then. I've been told to expect at least a year for this process of full on "homologacion" of my degree. Frustrating.

ajnabiyya

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2011, 09:36:36 AM »
Hola a todos. Thanks for posting on your experiences! I was wondering what people knew about when it is best to request a specific "homologación a un tÁ­tulo del catÁ¡logo de tÁ­tulos universitarios oficiales" and when "homologación a grado académico" is more appropriate. My impression is that the more specific one would be needed for something official like teaching in public schools, whereas the general one should be enough you want to study in a Spanish university's graduate program. But what about situations like applying to teach at a private school or university that happens to want its English teachers to have tÁ­tulos homologados? Do they tend to require them to have the official equivalent of a licenciatura de filologÁ­a inglésa or a tÁ­tulo de magisterio or whatever, or is it enough to have the homologación a grado?


At this point I'm very much leaning toward requesting a "homologación a grado de licenciatura" and not trying to homologize my masters degree, just because a general homologación of an undergrad degree seems like by far the easiest route, but I kind of feel like I'm making my decisions in the dark so if anyone has any input I'd certainly be grateful.


I think I'm going to start getting my papers together now to apply within the next few months, and I'll post on this thread afterwards to let future applicants know any details I can think of that might be helpful.

mll22

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2012, 06:20:30 PM »
Stacy, Rebecca,


So I'm returning to this thread to see how things turned out for you both with the homologaciones. As you can see, I've put it off for a few years, and now am returning to it to see if it's worth it.  I got my transcript and degree officially translated on my visit back to Spain last summer, but am debating if it's worth getting done.  I did interview with a private school a few years back, and she said I should call her once I get my degrees homologados.  My questions are mutliple:


1) What degrees did you get homologados and were you successful?  (My degrees are in Spanish and Mathematics. I'm scared I'll spend 99 euros for them to tell me, nope, you'll have to take more classes. I cannot see myself capable of taking a high level math class in Spanish, after being out of school for 6 years...)


2) Did you get the homologados a un titulo especifico (like diplomado en matematicas...) or a grado de diplomado/titulado?


3) If you got it homologado a grado, only, what doors has that opened up for you? Have private schools been able to hire you with that or do they require a titulo especifico? 


Thanks for any info. I really appreciate all of your info!


younghopeful

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2012, 08:54:39 PM »
Hi everyone!

I am in the process of applying not to a university, but to a technical school instead so I don't know if my particular situation is as stressful as trying to validate a full university degree. An IES is what they call them. Since all you need is a bachiller to apply, I figured that I could do that instead of validating my university degree of Spanish, which could take from months up to years just for them to tell me that I am not even finished with the degree according to them!! I don't have time for that. 
I'd like to know the process of validating a bachiller. I have been in contact with a sworn translator, and she has mentioned that she has experience with translating and certifying all types of degrees and transcripts. However, I don't know if that would be enough to be able to present to the academy to apply for a grado medio.

Also, does anyone have any experience with applying for school from WITHIN the United States? And I mean, not like studying abroad because that is different. Since I'd have to apply for a long-term student visa I have to get paperwork for that, but I cant without an acceptance letter from the academy where I would like to study.

I am very interested in hearing other people's experiences and any help is appreciated. I know that some forums go a long time without any replies at all, but I'd like to get some information to be able to be back in Spain for next year.
I don't think I could live with missing the Feria de Abril de Sevilla!  ;D

adimapamida

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Re: convalidating a u.s. degree
« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2014, 11:37:36 AM »
I don't know if this topic is still open or if anyone is still trying to do this, but I am at a complete loss as to where to go now.  (NOT to toot my own horn, just to give a proper summary of what i have).
Double major B.S. at a top 10 university
Courses from a year of study abroad at the complutense
masters degree in teaching
2 post-graduate certificates

I have done ALL of the proper translations and submitted everything properly (via gestor)

Came back "denegado"
Not "denegado and missing these classes" just flat out denied.  The lady at education snarkily replied that i qualified to take the "selectividad"

Seriously?

I NEED to get my degree convalidated.  From the look of this forum, NO ONE has had it done successfully (?)
Can anyone tell me where i can turn to?  Does anyone know if plan bologna can help me?
Thanks